In today’s enlightening discussion with our guest Leslie Gaudet, we delved into the importance of time management as a form of self-care. Leslie shared some invaluable insights and practical tips for creating a balanced and fulfilling life.

Key points discussed:

Learning to Say No and Asking for Help:

– Leslie emphasized the strength in learning to say no or deferring tasks when overwhelmed.

– Asking for help is not a weakness; it opens avenues for support, especially from a strong circle of people in one’s life.

Delegating Tasks and Building Trust:

– For those with a team, trust is paramount. Clearly articulate tasks, allow team members the freedom to execute, and cultivate relationships for continuous improvement.

Taking Mental Breaks:

– Continuous work without breaks hinders the brain’s ability to process and integrate information.

– Mental breaks don’t necessarily mean complete disengagement; activities like a walk with a podcast can be both refreshing and developmental.

Establishing a Hard Stop to the Day:

– A non-negotiable end to the workday is crucial for a good night’s sleep.

– Unwinding before bed allows the brain to transition from work mode to rest, avoiding the “monkey mind.”

Prioritizing Family Time:

– Recognizing the importance of family, Leslie shared a personal story highlighting the significance of setting boundaries for family interaction.

Structuring Your Day:

– Mapping out your day helps visualize available time and dispels the feeling of always working.

– Identifying white spaces allows for intentional breaks, fostering a sense of liberation.

Individualized Self-Care:

– Self-care routines are unique to each person. What works for a friend might not suit your lifestyle.

– Embrace a self-care routine that aligns with your daily rhythm and responsibilities.

Two-Way Street of Help:

– Acknowledge that offering and seeking help are interconnected. Allowing others to help is a mutually beneficial exchange.

Every Action as a Self-Care Moment:

– Viewing daily actions through a lens of service to oneself and others transforms routine tasks into self-care moments.

Helpful Links:

The Marketing VA Advantage 

Six Figure Business Coaching 

Mastering Online Marketing for Entrepreneurs

Double Your Income with a Marketing VA, even on a tight budget

Transcript
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Welcome to the six figure business mastery podcast, where every week

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Kirsten and Jeannie dive into the essential topics to fuel your business

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growth, from copywriting to course creation, mindset to video marketing.

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They've got you covered.

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Tune in for expert guest interviews on all things, marketing and

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business and learn how to work on your business, not just in it.

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So get ready to unlock your business potential and take it to the next level.

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So I'm Kirsten and that's Jeannie with Six Figure Business Coaching.

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And Jeannie, would you like to introduce our guest today?

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I would.

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I am so, so excited.

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I met this lovely lady not that long ago and she's amazing.

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Her name is Leslie Gaudette of Leslie Gaudette Coaching.

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She's a motivational speaker and internationally best selling author and

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self care coach for female entrepreneurs, coaches, and course creators.

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She helps her clients prioritize self care so they can wake up with

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more energy, focus, and intention.

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to tackle their daily activities and serve their clients with confidence.

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So as we all know, burnout is on the rise.

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In fact, over half of female entrepreneurs say burnout has made them consider

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giving up entrepreneurship altogether.

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And she said she can totally relate because that was her.

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That's why she knows that it is the lifeblood to our

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success in life and business.

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So Leslie is going to talk to us today about why self care is the

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answer to prevent burnout and give us some tips on how to avoid that.

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So thank you so much for being here, Leslie.

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Oh, thank you so much.

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I'm excited to be here with you ladies.

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You're too.

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This is such a great topic because it is sad to think that people overdo it

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to the point where they are willing to give up their dream or maybe not willing

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to, but they burn out to the point where they feel like they don't have a

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choice, but to give up on their dream.

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Yeah, absolutely.

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I agree.

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I think too.

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A lot of the time it's because we feel like we have to always be in the doing

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to feel successful when in fact we're not really doing ourselves any favors

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by always staying in the doing because we end up burning out really quick.

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Yeah, I think it's easy, especially for women to have the house and the kids and

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the community involvement and then the business and not being able to say no.

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And I feel like for me, I always joke that the first line of

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defense with self care is the word.

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No, I can't do that.

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Or no, I can't help with that.

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Or this timing.

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Is it right for me to do that?

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Or even with Jeannie and I, sometimes we have a great idea.

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We have to say it's a great idea, but no, it's not the right

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time to add something else.

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To our plate, our list of things to do.

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Yeah, I love that you have that because that's really one of my five essentials

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of self care is learning to say no, or not right now, because a lot of the

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time, as I was saying, we get in that doing and we're looking for success.

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And what is really success?

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It's, is it really burning yourself?

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The, the candle at both ends, or is it finding a way to be in, in the

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moment of what you're doing, being focused on that instead of everything

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all at once and burning yourself out.

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You have a choice to make.

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And I think when you know where you're at in your life, what you're working on

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right now and what you're doing aligns with that, anything that else pops

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up that might be part of the process.

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If it doesn't fit right now, if you're confident enough in what you're doing

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and that's where confidence is really something that you really have to

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cultivate, but if you're confident enough in what you're doing right now, then you

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can say either, no, this doesn't fit at all, or it just doesn't fit right now.

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And I'm okay to wait for it to show itself again.

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And in that process too.

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You open yourself up to that, maybe, just maybe something that you're working

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on right now, that little nugget that you're working on reveals something else

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because somebody, you get introduced to someone else, a new opportunity comes

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along and it actually takes you down a different path that may be even better

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than the one you actually had envisioned.

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So when you allow yourself to say no or not right now, that again, opens

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you up to something bigger or better.

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Absolutely.

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So I feel like there's a lot of confusion around what is self care

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and I feel like you have a really good, you really explain this nicely.

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And so we're like, let's start with the definition of self care.

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We know it's important because of burnout and things like that.

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But what is it?

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I think people think it's woo, or it's just sitting down and

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getting a pedicure or something.

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So how would you define self care and maybe a longer term strategy for

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self care based on the definition?

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Yeah.

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So I think a lot of people think that self care is what

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I've talked to different women.

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They've said to me, they believe that self care is the mani pedis

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and the massages, going out for fancy lunches, buying yourself

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something that the celebration part.

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And that's great because those are, those things are important

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because you're honoring yourself.

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And, but I truly believe when it comes to that.

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Full success in both our life, our personal life and our professional life.

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Self care goes beyond that.

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It's being able to have those essentials in your life, like making sure that

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you're protecting your time by having boundaries around your time, especially

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maybe saying, no, that's a boundary around your time or, and it really does

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come back to time or having a boundary around the things that you are willing to

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do or are interested to do or won't do.

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Like you having those.

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Boundaries, like you can have hard boundaries that say, no, I'm not

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willing to do that, or you can have boundaries that are soft, like this

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works for me, but, um, not right now, or it works for me and I want to

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explore it more, but it's also then having a rent again, being able to be

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structured in what you do daily, that's a self care moment for you because you.

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Have more, if you have clarity around what you're doing, if you know exactly

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where, what your day looks like and you've structured it in a way that's

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productive so that you get done the things that really matter, that really,

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what if you're trying to build something that moved the needle, but that are not.

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All over the place and doing everything every day, you use your

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time that allows you to get more done efficiently and it allows them that

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time to segue into your personal life because segue into your personal life.

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That means that you're going to have a hard stop to your day.

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And I think that's important.

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I think.

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There's a lot of women that I've talked to, especially today, that are, uh,

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working hours that are crazy hours because they're their own, they're their

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own business owner, and they haven't.

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I don't know if they haven't learned it, but maybe they, maybe there's just this

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misconception of what entrepreneurship is supposed to look like that you're

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supposed to always be working when really it's about, it really does come

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down to working smarter, not harder.

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But how do you do that?

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And so I truly believe that when you have that clarity around what you do on a daily

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basis, then, you know, exactly like what your Mondays or Tuesdays or Wednesdays or

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Thursdays and your Fridays look like, and hopefully you're not working all weekend.

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Hopefully that time is spent doing things with your friends, your

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family, with your loved ones, cultivating those relationships.

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Because they're going to support you during those times when maybe you're

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not feeling so great about life.

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Having that hard stop too is allowing you then to even at the end of your

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day, I know a lot of women who are moms who have families and it's that

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time to cultivate with their kids, with their significant other, or even if

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they're a single mom, it's that time with their children, creating those.

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Those bonds, because they're also teaching their kids that self care is important.

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And part of it is the relationship aspect of it, the building of the relationships.

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And then 1 thing I think is really important again, when it comes to

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time is learning how to take breaks if you don't take breaks throughout

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your day, and you're always working.

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You might think that, Oh, this is normal for me.

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I've done this for so long.

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I've been doing this, but you might end up in a burnout moment.

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I have my own story around burnout in my early twenties, because I was

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that girl who thought I could, I, this is how I am, this is how I work.

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There's no problem.

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I have all this energy.

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I there's nothing wrong until it ended up.

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Coming at me full force and I didn't know what to do.

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I started having panic attacks.

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So it's really learning to take those breaks so that you're allowing

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yourself to rest your mind, to rest, to, to process what you fed it.

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Cause it's like you're feeding your body while you're feeding your brain.

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When you're constantly, when you're looking at a screen and you're

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working on something, you're feeding your brain, but it has to have

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time to digest what you fed it.

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And so if you don't give yourself the break.

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It's like your brain is just going to go on overload and you're

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going to find you become restless.

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You might become tired, irritable, emotional, not knowing why you're feeling

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less motivated, distracted because burnout is on the horizon for you.

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And so it's all these little things around self care that we know are important.

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But often, I think there could be, and I don't know, I haven't asked this

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question of anyone yet, but do you feel that self care, and this is a question

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I'd love to know the answer to, that maybe someone feels, some of the people

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that I've talked to feel that self care is intrusive of their time, rather than

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something that actually supports them, so that they can use their time wisely,

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and they can have more quality of life.

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Yeah, I love that.

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So time management isn't just a productivity thing.

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It's, it is a self care thing.

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And I imagine there's a lot of people who just feel like they need to be in

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front of the computer all day long, but they're not necessarily working.

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You know what I mean?

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They're, they're, they think they're working and they feel

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like they're working because the computer's in front of them, but.

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I know that when I take breaks or when I take an entire 24

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hours off, I feel rejuvenated.

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I feel excited again to jump back in it.

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So I don't, I think people forget that that time away can be very positive.

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And sometimes actually when I've got Something that I'm stuck on that I can't,

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I can't figure out how to fix or I can't figure out what the right direction is

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when I step away from it and do something else, go, go outside or play with my

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dogs, or I've just started a puzzle, something that kind of relaxes your brain.

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And then sometimes that answer comes and you go, Oh, that was it.

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So that can be really creative, productive time, even though it's.

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Relaxing and self care time.

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Yeah, absolutely.

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Cause think about, this is another thing when it comes to

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the hard stop that I mentioned.

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If you work until let's say nine, 10 o'clock at night, 11 o'clock at night,

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some women I know are into the wee hours of the next day when you're finished

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with what you're doing and then you try to go to sleep, what's happened.

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It's like feeding your body food.

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Uh, your body's trying to digest while your brain's trying to digest.

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And so it's on like on autopilot and you're like, Oh my gosh, I, I

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want to, I just want to go to sleep.

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But you, what you've done is you've turned your brain on and said,

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okay, I want you to process this.

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So you can't, it's like trying to have both things at one time.

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And it's impossible.

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If your brain is saying, I want to talk about this.

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I want to think about this.

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I want to process this.

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I want to unravel this mystery that whatever this is that you've given me

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to look through to, to, Figure out.

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And that's why I've even found myself.

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If I've done that, it's really hard to go to sleep.

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And then you might even wake up in the middle of the night.

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Because now, cause your brain is like saying, aha, and it's always like, it's

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waking you up and saying, by the way, I wanted you to know this, and then

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you're trying to get back to sleep again.

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And it's, it's really important.

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I think to recognize that it's knowing how you spend your days.

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will help that you being able to have those hard stops so that you

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feel satisfied with what you've done and knowing what you do every day is

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not doing everything every day, but having it spread out throughout your

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week and what does that look like?

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And if you have a team, what does that look like for them?

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Because you also want to make sure that they're using their time

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wisely, that they're also making sure that self care is priority.

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So you have a well rounded, healthy team, but also you get things done.

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This is so funny because it makes me think of a story, something that

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actually happened, Jeannie and I have a friend and her name is Michelle and

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she owns a law firm and Michelle and I were in the strategic coach program.

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15, 20 years ago.

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It's been a long time.

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But when you talk about structuring your day, They're really big on Friday,

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Saturdays and Sundays are off and you work four days a week and you have a real

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structure to your time and hard stops, like you said, and so one of the things

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that they talk about for time management is to try to have all of your appointments

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on the same days, obviously, if you have court dates and things like that, you

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can't control everything, but what was happening was her team was used to, if

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people called in to talk about their case and set up an initial consultation with

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her, they would just book them whenever Whatever day they could come in and so

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she was saying, no, I can only do these meetings on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

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These are my days to meet with clients to figure out their case.

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If I can take their case.

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These are the days I'm doing that.

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She kept telling her staff that, and they kept booking them on Mondays,

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Wednesdays, Fridays, just whenever.

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And I'll just never forget we were actually at our coaching session in

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Philadelphia, and she was venting about this and basically our coach Jan said,

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get up right now and go call your staff and tell them to cancel every appointment

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that's not on the Tuesday or Thursday and to move them to Tuesday or Thursday.

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And if they cannot, then they won't be our clients.

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So it was hard and fast.

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You're either going to move them to Tuesday or Thursday, because

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that was the excuse her team used.

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They couldn't come in on a Tuesday or Thursday.

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So she had to actually say, if they can't come in on the Tuesday

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or the Thursday, they're meant to go to a different attorney.

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They're not going to be our client at all.

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But it was miraculous when she drew that hard line in the sand for her team.

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Miraculously, everyone was able to come in on the Tuesday or the Thursday.

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And I think that's That's what happens with us, right?

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We, in our minds, we create these boundaries that if I don't say yes,

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if Monday's my day to just do office work and record videos and not take

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appointments, if somebody wants to meet on a Monday, if I don't say yes to them.

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Then I'm going to lose them.

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So we're so like, we just don't have the ability, like you said, to have

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the boundaries, but accepting that if someone can't meet with you with the works

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within your schedule, that maybe that person's not meant to be your client.

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And I know that's scary, but I feel like that's a form of self care honoring.

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The way you set up your day and the way you choose to work, whether you're

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a solopreneur or you have a team.

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So I'm so glad that you brought this up because I can't, I don't think most people

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think of this type of thing as self care.

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And it's really where it starts, right?

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Absolutely.

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And one of the things too about Protecting your time, especially around

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that is that makes sure that you are accountable to your own boundary as well.

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So she is accountable to her own boundary and she'd been trying to get her

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staff to understand that teaches them.

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In a way, it's a learning moment for them.

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And hopefully they learned from that, that this is something

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that they can do for themselves.

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You don't have to say yes to everything.

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And of course, if someone's not meant for you, that's okay.

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You don't want to show up to a call because you feel obligated.

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You have to be there and that energy comes across.

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I don't feel like being on this call today.

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It's a, it's a nuisance.

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It's interrupting my day that I typically have on a Monday or a Wednesday.

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And because you've gone ahead and booked these calls for me, uh, now, you know, I

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have to grudgingly show up to these calls.

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And I think teaching her staff that my time is important

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and there's a reason there's.

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a structure to what I've done for myself and that hopefully teaches them that.

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So hopefully they learned from it.

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There's that whole people pleasing thing too and I think people are

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afraid to say no because they, maybe they were afraid to say no because

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they didn't want to lose the business.

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But finally understanding when she said look if, if They're not willing to change

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to Tuesday or Thursday, then they're not meant to be served by this law firm.

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And that's okay.

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And that really, I think, gives them permission to be like, oh,

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okay, now I fully understand.

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So I love that.

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Well, thank you.

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Yeah, I think a lot of self care for again, I think Jeannie

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and I will both feel this way.

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Is the inner work, right?

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It's doing the inner work to feel confident in the choices that we make.

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We're feeling like we deserve to have a structure that we're able to manage.

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And yes, things always happen.

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There are emergencies and things that pop up, but it's not a day to day thing.

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It's not a week to week thing.

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It's the exception, not the rule.

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But I know.

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Again, we've had both had to do a lot of inner work to get there.

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So you have the confidence and you have, I think, just the sense of who you

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are, what you want, and a good picture of how you want your life to flow.

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And so do you feel like inner work is part of the self care that

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you talk to your clients about?

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Absolutely 100 percent because I think it comes from how we feel about ourselves

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is the way we show up in our world.

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So whatever is being reflected back to us is what we're reflecting out to the

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world so if you are, for example, maybe you're someone who It has a hard time

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saying no, because you don't let, you don't want people to judge you or you

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don't want people to talk badly of you.

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You don't want to disappoint people.

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You want people to like you.

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It all comes from that external validation.

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And that could be something from the past.

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A lot of my work that I've done with my clients is taking them back to the

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past because that's where the clues are.

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The clues to how we show up in our world today is reflected from the things

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that have happened to us in our lives.

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The way we processed.

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Uh, our experiences.

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And so, one of the things I always like to, to talk about is public speaking.

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I have a client right now who recently just left her PR position company for

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some personal reasons, but she was so used to being out in the public and speaking,

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but someone like that has to have that confidence to be able to do that.

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And if you come from a background where Maybe you were judged or criticized by

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something you said when you were younger, maybe giving a presentation and especially

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maybe in school, you're giving a class presentation and some of the students

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laugh, they were laughing because they were being silly in the back, maybe of

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the room, but you thought it was because of you and you take that with you.

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You take it with you and through your life and you might have had another

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similar occasion happen and then all of a sudden that becomes your truth for you.

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So now when it comes to public speaking, you're nervous.

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You are, you're hesitant, you push back if someone asks you to do it, you maybe

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even outright refuse, you come up with the excuses that you can't do it when it's

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really, there's that fear that people will laugh or have something to say or judge.

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One of the things that's important for people to remember is everyone has an

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opinion, it doesn't have to be the truth.

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Someone has an opinion about you doesn't mean that it's true.

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Someone might not like what you're presenting.

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That's okay.

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That's their opinion.

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And if you can look at it from that perspective, then it

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can give you that confidence.

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But also too, if that was you, as an example, where you were criticized when

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you were younger, and you thought judged about your public speaking skills.

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Just because you, some of the students in the back of the room laughed

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and you thought they were laughing at you, making fun of you, look

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at it from that perspective, that maybe they were just being silly.

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They were passing notes.

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They were joking around because in school, that's some of the things I remember

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seeing some of my classmates do laughing, passing notes, passing notes about who

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likes who, and all of those crazy puzzles that were going around in school, looking

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at it from that perspective gives you like, Oh, maybe that is what it was.

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And even if it wasn't, wasn't that, I can always look at it

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from this perspective today.

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I'm a much different person.

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I can now start looking for the evidence that I can actually do that,

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because number one, if someone asks you to do it, Then obviously they saw

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something in you that maybe you failed to see, but they saw something in you.

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So that's evidence to support that you can do it.

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So start looking for the evidence.

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So that's how I, for me, what I do is not only do I have them go back to looking at

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the past, but if there's something that they're dealing with today, I ask them

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to provide me first with the evidence to support the negative way of thinking.

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And if it's just fear.

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I can always, then I say, okay, if it's just the fear, what is

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the evidence that can support.

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What you want, and we walk through that and it's really helpful to be able to

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look at it from the two sides of the coin, like the one where there's really

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no supportive evidence and the other side of the coin where it's like heavier with

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all of these great supporting things.

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Other people are coming to you, asking you to do speaking engagements, people

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asking you to be on their podcasts, people asking you to be on their TV shows.

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Then that's a good thing.

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Obviously there's the evidence to support that.

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you actually can do this.

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There's probably other things as well.

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So that's like how I do it from both sides.

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That's fantastic.

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I couldn't help, but I don't know if you saw me.

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I giggled for a second because my best friend from third grade was

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just visiting with me last week.

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So she's been a week here in Sarasota.

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And I had maybe 3 or 4 years ago.

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I found a small box of letters.

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There were notes.

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Some of them were letters that we had written in the summer back

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when you actually wrote letters to each other over the summer.

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But a lot of them were notes that were folded like those little triangle

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things that you passed in class.

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So we were reading those and we were dying laughing.

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So yeah, you think about all the things that happened when we were kids and how

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it does affect us, sometimes in a negative way, but I can tell you from reading

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those notes, we were all idiots, right?

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And I'm sure that your classmates were all idiots too.

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So you gotta let it go.

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And I think it's, that's fantastic that you help people with that.

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And earlier you said something about you have five essential things that you

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actually work with your clients with.

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Yeah.

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So there's five, I feel like the five essentials of self

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care to help you support you professionally and personally are.

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First of all, I talked about it already is learning to say no or not

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right now, because that's important.

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You know, if you say yes to everything, what you're doing is you're shutting

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the door to all the possibilities that are actually better for you, that might

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actually lead you down a better path.

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You know, when someone says this or something better that you know, if

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you can really lean into that, it's a great way to think because you don't

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want to be just rigid on one thing.

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To the point where you don't allow yourself to be open to other things.

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So learning to say no or not right now, the other is asking for help.

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This is one of the things that I learned became a strength for me.

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I always thought it was a weakness to ask for help because that meant I had to be

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vulnerable and admit things out loud that.

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I was afraid to, but when you do that, it opens you up to get support, also

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can open you up to get support from people that might be in your circle.

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Like, especially if you have a really good circle of people in your life

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who support you, they could help you with what you're dealing with,

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asking for help too, so that you don't have to do everything by yourself.

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Means that you can free up some of your time.

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So part of that is delegating your tasks.

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If you have a team being able to trust your team that if you know

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exactly what it is that they're that you want them to do that, you're

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able to articulate that enough that they understand and then giving them.

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The ability to do it and be okay with allowing them that freedom and then

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getting back to them and cultivating that relationship with your team members

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so that they get better and better at what they do, like your friend did with

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the learning about appointment setting.

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Then the next one would be taking mental breaks.

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I think this is the most important one because If you're always working

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and you're not taking any breaks, then you're not allowing your brain

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to, to, as I would say, digest what you've already, what you've fed it.

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Uh, and that means it doesn't mean like you turn off work screen and

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you go to your phone and turn on social media, complete break from it.

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Now, if you use your phone, like I do, I'll go for a walk and I'll

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use my phone to listen to a podcast or listen to an audible book, then

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that's different because I'm not.

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I'm just listening as I'm outside in nature, but for the, I'm not

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really, I'm filling my mind with positivity in a way to help me grow.

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Cause I always feel like self development is a lifestyle choice.

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And I think it's important to continuously grow so that we feel good about ourselves

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and we live a really great life.

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So taking those breaks is really important.

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Then having that hard stop to the day.

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So for me, I think is probably crucial, especially if you want

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to get a good night's sleep.

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If you just turn off your laptop at 9 p.

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m., and then you fall into bed after you've just finished working on a

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presentation, and then you fall into bed, your brain isn't turning off.

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So you're going to have that monkey mind.

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So being able to like allow yourself to unwind from it allows you to

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then set yourself up, like your brain to wind down, if you will.

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And also too, if you have a family, one of the ladies that I know, she's,

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she's amazing at what she does, but one of the things she told me recently

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with, from her four year old son was, mommy, can you put your phone down?

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And she recognized that, oh boy.

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My four year old is asking me to put my phone down.

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And then her husband reiterates that by saying, yes, can you put your phone down?

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Because this time should be for us.

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And so she recognized that.

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And now she has a hard stop that is non negotiable.

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That she spends time with her family so she can build those bonds.

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And that fosters a great relationship with her own family.

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But it also teaches now her son and her daughter that they're important.

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And that self care is important.

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They might not know that it's self care related, but they're, she's going

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to teach them that and then for me, I think is the last thing is really

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around that time, that time for.

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Setting, structuring your day, like I really feel is so important,

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time, it always comes back to time.

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And so one of the things that I would suggest, and I always suggest this to

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the women that I work with, is take a piece of paper and write down or

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Make a Google Docs folder and put the time you get up in the morning to the

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time you stop work and fill in all of your actual things that you do on the

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times that you have allotted for them.

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And it allows you to see all the white space that you have available.

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And then you'll see that you're not really always working.

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But if you don't know what it looks like, you're going to feel

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like you're always working, that you don't really have the time.

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Because a lot of women will say, I don't have time.

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What do you really do on a day?

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I do this and I do this.

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But are you doing that all day long?

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Or is just a part of your day?

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So allowing yourself to see where you're, what you actually do every

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day, where your actual appointments are, then being able to see, oh, I have

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all this available time, It's really liberating to see all this available time.

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Oh, I can go for a walk here.

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Oh, I can go and do yoga.

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I can, maybe this is my hard stop.

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So now family has a couple hours.

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We're going to do this.

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We're going to sit around the dinner table.

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We're going to talk.

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We're going to do this.

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We're going to do whatever that looks like for you is how, when you see that time

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for you is going to be really liberating.

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And.

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Um, and I think this to go with that, as I also want to reiterate

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is that self care doesn't have to look the same as everyone else.

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So your friends self care routine is not your routine.

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It's your routine has to fit your lifestyle.

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I'm not a mom, so I don't have young children, and I didn't have young

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children I've been married now just over 27 years and we did, we had decided not

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to have children because we moved a lot.

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And I didn't, we didn't want to really.

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Have kids uprooting them, like every few years, it's now

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been for the last three years.

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It's been every like five, six months.

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And so now, like, my time is so different.

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I can structure my days differently.

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You might not be able to do that.

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So be okay that your self care, whatever you, however you start your

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day, started on a, started with a win for you and then sprinkle throughout

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the day that you're making sure you're having those hard stops, the learning

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to say no's, you're not start saying yes to everything, taking those breaks,

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all of those things, asking for help if you need it, be open and vulnerable.

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It's okay.

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I promise.

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If you have a really great group of people who love you, it's okay to ask.

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I think it's interesting because women are so quick to offer help and do

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things for other people, but we don't realize it's a two sided coin, right?

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So think about how good you feel or we feel when we're

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actually able to help someone.

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So if you're not asking for help and you're not letting other people help

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you, in some ways you're robbing them of the opportunity to feel good.

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We all enjoy helping each other, but it is a two way street.

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And so I find it fascinating that we are so Afraid or,

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um, hesitant to ask for help.

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So I love that that's one of your self care points.

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I would have never thought about that as a self care point, but I think it's

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absolutely incredible that you do.

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I mean, you really opened my eyes up to that.

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Um, and of course, Jeannie and I are really big on helping our clients

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with delegating, building their team.

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Um, because again, as a business owner, you only have so many hours in the day

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and you started your business because you.

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Have the interest in helping people, the desire to help people, but you end

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up spending so much time doing little piddly things that are not really getting

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you closer to serving more people.

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So I love the fact that you talk about that, um, is a self-care thing.

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So thank you.

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You're welcome.

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Yeah, self care is found in everything we do, including if you're, if you cook

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for a family or cook for yourself, or if you have just someone in your home,

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in your life that you cook for, you are, that's a self care moment because you're

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not just throwing something together.

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You're thinking like, how are they going to like it?

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I want to make it, you're making it with love.

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So that's, you can look at.

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Every interaction that you, everything that you do in life

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can be a self care moment.

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If you look at it from how is this of service to myself, to others,

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to make this world a better place.

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Yeah, Jeannie, when you're here and I'm cooking for you, it's all lovely.

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Oh, I love that!

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Kirsten's a fantastic cook and so is my husband, so I am

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spoiled and I'm okay with that.

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So Leslie, we have so enjoyed having you.

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You are a wealth of information as well as you make me want to

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take better care of myself and I think that's what it's all about.

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Yeah, thank you so much.

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I've really loved being here.

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Good, and you have a free self care guide.

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That I will share below.

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Um, I will share a link to that so everybody can grab that, but

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we love, love, love having you.

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We can't wait to implement because again, like you said, we don't think

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of time management as self care, but it actually is, and I feel like

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there's lots of little things that we can do every day to using your tips.

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To, to just be happier and more energetic.

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Yes.

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Yeah.

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And we also have a free guide for you guys.

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It's called double your income with a marketing virtual assistant.

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So that might be a part of your self health or your self care is to

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actually think about hiring someone.

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So if we can help you with that, we would love to.

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So this has been an awesome conversation.

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Thank you, ladies.

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Thank you.

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Thank you so much.

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And we will see you all next week.

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So thanks for being here again, Leslie, and we'll talk to you all soon.

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Thanks for listening to the six figure business mastery podcast.

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